Vegetables



List of: Vegetables
Ahipa
Amaranth
American
Groundnut
Aonori
Armenian
Cucumber
Arracacha
Arugula
Asparagus
Asparagus Pea
Avocado
Azuki Bean
Bamboo Shoot
Beetroot
Bitter Melon
Bitterleaf
Black Cumin
Black Eyed Pea
Brinjal
Broadleaf Arrowhead
Broccoli
Caigua
Cabbage
Canna
Cardoon
Carola
Carrot
Cassava
Catsear
Cayenne
Pepper
Celeriac
Celery
Celtuce
Ceylon Spinach
Chayote
Chickpea
Chicory
Chile Pepper
Chinese Artichoke
Chinese Mallow
Chrysanthemum
Corn Salad
Cress
Cucumber
Dabberlocks
Daikon
Dandelion
Dolichos Bean
Drumstick
Dulse
Earthnut Pea
Eggplant Or Aubergine
Elephant
Endive
Ensete
Epazote
Fat Hen
Fava Bean
Fiddlehead
Florence Fennel
Fluted Pumpkin
French Bean
Garlic
Ginger
Globe Artichoke
Gobo
Golden Samphire
Good King Henry
Guar
Hamburg Parsley
Hijiki
Horse Gram
Iceplant
Indian Pea
Jerusalem Artichoke
Jicama
Kohlrabi
Kombu
Kuka
Kurrat
Lady Finger
Lagos Bologi
Land Cress
Leek
Lentil
Lettuce
Lima Bean
Lizard's Tail
Lotus Root
Luffa
Maca
Malabar Gourd
Malanga
Marrow
Mashua
Mauka
Melokhia
Moth Bean
Mozuku
Mung Bean
Mushroom
Mustard
New Zealand Rock Lily
New Zealand Spinach
Nopal
Nori
Oca
Ogonori
Okra
Onion
Orache
Parsnip
Parwal
Pea
Peanut
Perennial Cucumber
Pigeon Pea
Pignut
Plectranthus
Potato
Prairie Turnip
Prussian Asparagus
Pumpkin
Radicchio
Radish
Rhubarb
Rice Bean
Runner Bean
Rutabaga
Salad Rape
Salsify
Samphire
Scorzonera
Sea Beet
Sea Grape
Sea Lettuce
Seakale
Shallot
Sierra Leone Bologi
Skirret
Snake Gourd
Soko
Sorrel
Soybean
Spinach
Summer Purslane
Sweet Pepper
Sweet Potato
Sweetcorn
Swiss Chard
Taro
Tarwi
Tepary Bean
Ti
Tigernut
Tinda
Tomatillo
Tomato
Turnip
Ulluco
Urad Bean
Velvet Bean
Wakame
Wasabi
Water
Chestnut
Water Spinach
Watercress
Welsh Onion
West Indian Gherkin
Wild Leek
Winter Melon
Winter Purslane
Yacon
Yam
Yardlong Bean
Zucchini
Courgette


Vegetables are eaten in a variety of ways, as part of main meals and as snacks. The nutritional content of vegetables varies considerably, though generally they contain little protein or fat, and varying proportions of vitamins, provitamins, dietary minerals, fiber and carbohydrates. Vegetables contain a great variety of other phytochemicals, some of which have been claimed to have antioxidant, antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral and anticarcinogenic properties.
However, vegetables often also contain toxins and antinutrients such as a-solanine, a-chaconine, enzyme inhibitors (of cholinesterase, protease, amylase, etc.), cyanide and cyanide precursors, oxalic acid, and more. Depending on the concentration, such compounds may reduce the edibility, nutritional value, and health benefits of dietary vegetables. Cooking and/or other processing may be necessary to eliminate or reduce them.
Diets containing recommended amounts of fruits and vegetables may help lower the risk of heart diseases and type 2 diabetes. These diets may also protect against some cancers and decrease bone loss. The potassium provided by both fruits and vegetables may help prevent the formation of kidney stones.

The noun vegetable usually means an edible plant or part of a plant other than a sweet fruit or seed. This typically means the leaf, stem, or root of a plant.
However, the word is not scientific, and its meaning is largely based on culinary and cultural tradition. Therefore, the application of the word is somewhat arbitrary and subjective. For example, some people consider mushrooms to be vegetables, while others consider them a separate food category.
Some vegetables can be consumed raw, some may be eaten cooked, as some must be cooked in order to be edible. Vegetables are most often cooked in savory or salty dishes. However, a few vegetables are often used in desserts and other sweet dishes, such as rhubarb pie and carrot cake.
As an adjective, the word vegetable is used in scientific and technical contexts with a different and much broader meaning, namely of "related to plants" in general, edible or not — as in vegetable matter, vegetable kingdom, vegetable origin, etc. The meaning of "vegetable" as "plant grown for food" was not established until the 18th century.